logo
Published on Mommy Tracked (http://www.mommytracked.com)

Eve Newhart

We would like to introduce you to the brave and inspiring Eve Newhart, a Cedars-Sinai trained internist and nephrologist who just left the practice of medicine to open a snazzy, women's clothing boutique in Los Angeles.

Eve got her undergraduate degree at Columbia and her medical degree at Brown. After her residency and internship, she dove into her life as a highly trained physician. Then she had three kids and decided to make a major professional life change.

At the time she left medicine for a full-time career in retail, she was only practicing 5 to 10 hours a week. It wasn't about the hours -- it was about pursuing her dream of owning her own business and making her own rules.

Go Eve.

For those of you who live in L.A. or are ever there for business or pleasure, stop by WICATI on Westwood Boulevard. The brand new, stylish and already quite successful shop is named for her three kids, William, Caroline and Timothy.


Why did you leave the practice of medicine to open a retail store?

It sounds strange, but because I can do it on my own terms. I worked with a large, esteemed practice of almost all men and if I ever were to jump back into "partnership track" they would be telling me when I need to be there and when I can go home. This way, I can make arrangements to pick up my kids when I want to. What has come out of this is realizing that if/when I go back to medicine, I may have to be in solo practice. And I may focus on women's health.

Would you work if you could afford to stay home?
Absolutely. I have stayed home and it's better for all of us if I have some "me time" and for me that means work.

Describe your childcare set up.
During the school year, I have a nanny from about 7:30 am to 4:00 p.m. In the summertime, my husband is home (he is a teacher) so she has an easy 8 to 12 job for the most part.

How does the question of who earns more in your house impact the domestic workload?
It doesn't. We both work. We both chip in at home.

Did your mom work? If so, what did she do?
My mom raised four kids and almost always worked. She is trained as a biochemist, did research on diabetes, then co-founded a well-known Los Angeles school called Crossroads. She then started a successful pharmaceutical company. Now she's super-grandma and helps Unicef. She is amazing.

How often do you have dinner with your kids?
We eat dinner as a family every night. I try to make it a healthy meal, but sometimes it is pizza or mac & cheese.

Do you travel for your job? How often? Do you try to avoid it when you can or do you consider it the great escape?
I am about to travel for the first time on a buying trip for the store. I am terrified and elated at the same time.

What is the one thing you vowed you would never do when you had kids that you find yourself doing?
Losing my temper. That is why I need to work.

Do you have date night with your spouse or partner?
Not regularly . . .working on it.

Forgive us for asking, but how often do you have sex?
My husband would kill me if I answered this question. Let's just say I am working on it.

Do you feel that you have made professional sacrifices to be a better parent?
Absolutely. I never dreamed that I wouldn't be a full-time physician right now.

What is your favorite thing to do with your kids?
Anything as long as they aren't fighting.

What is the best piece of advice you have ever received about juggling work and family?
My mom once told me that you can have it all -- just not all at the same time.

What are the three adjectives that best describe you?
Driven, compulsive and compassionate.

Describe your worst working mom moment.
I worked full time during the first year of my oldest's life. When I got home from work, he wouldn't even smile at me.

What are the best and worst things about being a working mom?
The best thing is satisfaction at home and at work and the worst thing is the fatigue.


Source URL:
http://www.mommytracked.com/eve-newhart