How Does Your Job Rank?

Everywhere I look at work these days—the break room, the lobby, even my office chair—fliers and signs are proclaiming McGraw-Hill, my employer, one of the 2007 Working Mother 100 Best Companies.


In case my co-workers and I failed to notice these missives, a video is playing in a non-stop loop on television screens around the office featuring some of McGraw-Hill’s top brass talking about the company’s exemplary Work/Life policies.

 

Normally, I look at best and worst lists with a lot of disdain. (I’m one of those cynical journalists.) But this time around, bragging rights are in order: Not only is McGraw Hill on Working Mother’s list for the third year in a row, in 2007 we broke into the top-10 ranks.

 

Maybe I’ve drunk the Kool Aid, but I’m actually proud to work at one of the best companies for working moms. It’s certainly been an outstanding experience for me and my family. In the past three years as a working mom, I’ve taken advantage of many family-friendly benefits at my company, but my personal favorite is flextime.

Since I returned from seven months of maternity leave in May 2005, I have worked at home on Wednesdays. The two hours I save commuting back and forth to the office on Wednesdays mean that I can spend more time with my toddler son.

 

Wednesday is typically date night for me and my little guy—either we make pizza together at home, or we go for the early-bird special at a local restaurant. It’s so nice not to rush home from the office and whip up dinner one evening during the work week. Of course, I have to be flexible, too—some Wednesdays I need to go into the office for meetings, but I don’t mind because it doesn’t happen a lot. Flextime is a perk that keeps me extremely loyal to McGraw-Hill.

 

Although flextime isn’t universal across Corporate America yet, it’s one of the things workers who have it covet the most. In fact, a recent study found workers who telecommute from home or elsewhere report the highest levels of satisfaction with their jobs and the most loyalty to their employers. I am certainly one of them.

 

Jamie ludwig
11.07.07

Need to clarify after writing that (little guy is teething=nosleep= no cognative thinking) STD=Short Term Disability

Jamie ludwig
11.07.07

It's wonderful that these companies exist! I am salaried for a major international mining company which has virtually nothing when it comes to having a baby. I had an emergency C-section and was given 4 weeks paid leave. I came back after 5 weeks (single mom needed money) and had to work at the mine site (1 hour on a dirt road from town) even though the company has an office in town and the majority of my work is writing. SO be thankful for what we do get (many dont even get the STD that I did) and lobby for more family leave federal laws!

dotty
10.23.07

You guys are so lucky. Although I work for a woman based company, there isn't any of these benefits. I work part time now, but I practically gave up my career and have to switch to another job. The arrangement is good now, but I definitely pursued this and PO a few management.

You guys are sooooo lucky!

AmyF
10.02.07

I worked for a company on Working Mother's Top 100 List (still do sometimes). I had a great set-up with working from home. I think with any work situation, whether you do a flexible schedule depends on your boss and your client. Supervisors at my company were reviewed on their adherence to family friendly policies as well as diversity, so that helped a lot. I did notice that very few women stayed home after they had babies, so I think it was good for the company and it made it nicer to work in an environment where there were a lot of other working moms.

AmyF
www.sofiabean.com

KathMeistr
10.02.07

My company (which shall remain nameless) has appeared on the List for several years... for some good reasons. However, the main reasons cited in the magazine are pretty farcical for most women here. Sure, the flexible work arrangement policy exists, but the word on the street is that it's nearly impossible to get a FWA approved. How many other women think that their company's listing is mostly a PR gimmick to attract employees? The trick is to find a way to get your company to LIVE the spirit of work/life balance and flexibility, not to pay it lip service for PR purposes.

shannadl
10.02.07

I just started with a company based on Working Mother magazine. I cannot believe the difference in the culture! I am so grateful and excited to be in one of these top 100 companies!